Tags
Industry News

Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver pledge to cut waste sent to landfill and incineration by 50 percent

Commitment by 23 cities and regions globally to avoid disposal of at least 87 million tons of waste by 2030

Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver have joined 20 leading cities around the world in making a commitment to zero waste ahead of the Global Climate Action Summit, which takes place September 12-14 in San Francisco, California.

At the end of August, 23 pioneering cities and regions committed to significantly cut the amount of waste they generate, accelerating them on the path toward zero waste. By signing C40's Advancing Towards Zero Waste Declaration, these cities and regions have pledged to cut the amount of waste generated by each citizen 15% by 2030, reduce the amount of waste sent to landfills and incineration by 50% and increase the diversion rate to 70% by 2030.  Signatory cities and regions include Auckland, Catalonia, Copenhagen, Dubai, London, Milan, Montreal, Navarra, New York City, Newburyport, Paris, Philadelphia, Portland, Rotterdam, San Francisco, San Jose, Santa Monica, Sydney, Tel Aviv, Tokyo, Toronto, Vancouver & Washington D.C
 
The 150 million citizens that live in the 23 cities and regions are accelerating the transition to a zero-waste future and will avoid the disposal of at least 87 million tons of waste by 2030.
 
Such bold commitments, made ahead of the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco, are essential steps in delivering on the highest goals of the Paris Agreement and keeping global temperature rise below 1.5℃.
 
Worldwide waste generation is increasing faster than any other environmental pollutant, and action in this sector can have a much faster and greater impact in combating climate change. For instance, the 1.3 billion tonnes of annual worldwide food scraps sent to landfills each year decomposes into methane, which is a much more potent greenhouse gas than CO2 and already accounts for 25% of current global warming. Transforming solid waste and material management systems globally could reduce global emissions by 20%.
 
That is why mayors of the world's urban centres are accelerating the transition towards a zero-waste future. Mayors have committed to taking ambitious, measurable and inclusive actions to reduce municipal solid waste generation and improve materials management in their cities, both key to making our urban centres cleaner, healthier, more resilient and inclusive. Better waste management can also create jobs and economic opportunities for social entrepreneurs and vulnerable communities.

"Montréal believes in the value of collective action by cities and their citizens in order to reach global waste reduction goals," commented Valérie Plante, Mayor of Montreal. "Our city's initiatives, such as the implementation of organic waste collection, and the development of a comprehensive plastic-reduction strategy on city territory, all converge towards one common goal: reducing household consumption, and providing alternatives to landfills for household waste." 

 The Advancing Towards Zero Waste Declaration is built on two bold commitments: 1) reducing the municipal solid waste generation per capita by at least 15% by 2030 compared to 2015; and 2) reducing the amount of municipal solid waste disposed to landfill and incineration by at least 50% by 2030 compared to 2015, and increasing the diversion rate away from landfill and incineration to at least 70% by 2030.

"Cities like Vancouver are stepping up and taking on an unprecedented role in reaching global waste reduction targets," said the Mayor of Vancouver, Gregor Robertson. "As our oceans and environment continue to be polluted, we recognize the urgency of reducing waste going to landfill and are committed to transitioning to be a zero-waste city."

Specifically, signatory cities will implement bold actions, including:
• Reduce food losses and wasting of food at the retail and consumer levels by decreasing losses along production and supply chains, minimizing the production of surplus food, and facilitating safe food donation and by-products for feed production.
• Implement source separated collection for food scraps and other organics and treatment infrastructure that recovers nutrients, energy and contributes to the restoration of carbon storage capacity in soils.
• Support the implementation of local and regional policies, such as extended producer responsibility and sustainable procurement, to reduce or ban single-use and non-recyclable plastics and other materials, while also improving goods reparability and recyclability.
• Increase reduction, reuse, recovery and recycling of construction and demolition materials.
• Increase accessibility, awareness, scale and inclusivity of reduction, reutilization and recycling programmes and policies for all communities and neighbourhoods, investing in city wide communication and engagement efforts, offering resources in multiple languages, and
• Ensure benefits are distributed equitably across the city population.
• Publicly report every two years on the progress the cities are making towards these goals.
 
Leading up to the Global Climate Action Summit, C40 urged cities to step up their climate action and ambition - the August announcement is one of the city commitments under that initiative. The high ambition Advancing Towards Zero Waste Declaration was developed by C40 and the city of San Francisco, in consultation with other C40 cities in the Waste to Resources network.
  
"Dramatically reducing waste will help curb carbon emissions while helping us build a fairer, cleaner and more livable city for all New Yorkers," said Bill de Blasio, Mayor of New York City. "Continuing to pile up more and more garbage in landfills is not sustainable, which is why we've created the largest organics collection and reuse program in the country, serving over three million New Yorkers. We're proud to stand alongside other leading cities worldwide in taking ambitious steps to cut down on waste."

Additional quotes from Mayors involved in the commitment.

"To deliver on the highest ambition of the Paris Agreement requires urgent transformations of every aspect of modern life, including our consideration about what we throw away," said Mayor of Paris and C40 Chair, Anne Hidalgo. "With this commitment, cities are getting the job done, inventing the new practices to build better cities for generations to come. One more time, the future is taking place in cities."

"To make Tokyo a world-leading, environment-conscious city, Tokyo is implementing ambitious actions to reduce and recycle municipal solid waste. Tokyo wishes to have every citizen become even more aware of "mottainai" (it's too precious to waste) and change their behavior. As a member of the C40 steering committee, I will work hand in hand with the world's major cities, and advance the initiatives," said Yuriko Koike, Governor of Tokyo
 
 Mayor of London, Sadiq Khan, said: "Earlier this year my Environment Strategy set out bold and ambitious targets for cutting waste in London. That means no biodegradable or recyclable waste sent to landfill by 2026, and cutting food waste and associated packaging by 50 per cent per head by 2030. It also means working hard to reduce single-use plastic bottles and packaging which can end up overflowing our landfills and finding their way into our oceans. Cities around the world must work together if we're going to make real progress in cutting waste."
 
 "Waste management is key for cities to rapidly lower their emissions", said Mayor of Milan Giuseppe Sala.  "Milan has reached an ambitious 60% of successful waste recycling through the active engagement of citizens and visitors and a strong focus on preventing food waste. It is a natural further step for Milan to join forces with other C40 cities in committing to a zero-waste future for a healthier environment".
 
 "Copenhagen fully supports the Zero Waste declaration. Cities need to take climate action now and deliver the highest goals of the Paris Agreement. The sustainable and liveable city of the future is also a city that moves towards zero-waste. In Copenhagen we are committed to become even greener to reach our goal of becoming the world's first co2-neutral city by 2025", says Lord Mayor of Copenhagen, Frank Jensen. 
 
 "Auckland is committed to protecting its environment in a sustainable way, which includes recycling rather than landfilling and tackling the critical challenges posed by climate change," said Phil Goff, Mayor of Auckland
  
"Philadelphia is proud to set an ambitious but achievable goal of becoming a Zero Waste city by 2035. Meeting this goal will not only cut carbon emissions and other pollutants, but will help reduce the waste entering landfills, combat litter, and enhance the cleanliness of streets and public spaces," said Jim Kenney, Mayor of Philadelphia
 
 "Our residents generate close to 65,000 tonnes of waste every year - and while we divert 69 per cent from landfill, our goal is to achieve ‘zero waste' by 2030. We'll soon extend our e-waste service to offer all residents free weekly pick-ups and we're trialling food and textiles collections from apartment buildings. We're also partnering with major hotel groups, museums and tourist icons like the Sydney Opera House to reduce their emissions, water and waste. It's an incredibly important partnership given Sydney's accommodation and entertainment sector generates 47 per cent of all commercial waste in our city," said Lord Mayor of Sydney, Clover Moore
  
"With these new commitments, we are advancing DC values and doubling down on our efforts to build a zero-waste future," said Washington, DC Mayor Muriel Bowser. "By building a greener, more resilient, and more sustainable DC, we're making good on our commitment to uphold the goals of the Paris Climate Accord and finding new ways to shrink our carbon footprint."

 "Newburyport is proud to join cities and mayors across the globe to address the critical need to reduce and advance our work towards zero waste. We have been working diligently with broad community partnerships to educate residents and incrementally achieve significant reductions through creative organics programs, hazardous waste and electronics recycling, banning single-use plastic bags and re-purposing excess foods in our schools. Each city that steps up to join these efforts will make a real difference today and as we plan for the future health of our communities," said Mayor of Newburyport, Donna D. Holaday.

Latest News

Tags
Fleets & Technology

How to select a heavy-duty engine oil for your waste fleet

Heavy-duty diesel vehicles that collect and transport waste and recyclables in urban environments, and which work at transfer station sites, material recycling facilities (MRFs) scrapyards and landfills, operate under tough conditions. In these settings, fleet managers are required to maintain high levels of monitoring on specialized vehicles to ensure optimum performance and safety of their employees. 

Read More

Tags
C&D Recycling
Industry News

Need to recycle highlighted at Circular Driven Economy Symposium 2018

Delegates to the Circular Driven Economy symposium heard from a variety of speakers on topics focused on improved recovery and reuse of C&D materials, among others.

Delegates from all over the world joined together at the inaugural Circular Driven Economy Symposium in London on the 18th - 19th September, to learn more about the opportunities in recovered construction and demolition waste material (C&D waste). Speakers from research bodies like SINTEF, academic institutions like Queen's University Belfast, construction and manufacturing firms like LafargeHolcim and Mapei, and the European Commission all provided plenty for delegates to think about. 

Read More

Sponsored Content

Leading Edge Security Technology

Caliber Communications Inc. is a technology-based Canadian company that has created a flexible, cost effective and reliable replacement to physical guarding services. The company has engineered and developed a unique communications platform that operates on the cellular infrastructure anywhere in North America. To date, this platform has been specifically utilized for applications requiring remote security monitoring in a variety of  industries, locations and settings. The platform is completely modular and can be completely independent of existing infrastructure where no resources are available.  This allows the units to be set up anywhere they are required to provide effective security coverage. If power is not readily available, the units are designed to operate on very low wattage making solar power a viable solution.  All units provide 360 degrees of situational awareness with stationary cameras. Additionally, all units come equipped with a PTZ camera (pan, tilt, zoom) to drill into the images and gather specific data for evidence.

Read More

Tags
Fleets & Technology

Mack Trucks boosting fleet safety with pre-wire options for Lytx DriveCam

The Mack Granite (here in a roll-off configuration) as well as LR and TerraPro models, are now available with pre-wired Lytx DriveCam technology.

Refuse and recycling trucks are some of the busiest big vehicles on the road, and spend most of their time navigating streets that are filled with other vehicles, as well as pedestrians and other potentially dangerous obstacles. To protect their drivers and trucks from potential harm, fleet managers are increasingly turning to camera systems that can provide views of both the drivers themselves and the roadway around them, offering multiple ways to improve safety.

Read More

Tags
Fleets & Technology

Mountain Tarp rounds out full line with addition of new ESR2000 Electric Side-to-Side Lock and Roll Tarping System

Mountain Tarp rounds out full line with addition of new ESR2000 Electric Side-to-Side Lock and Roll Tarping System

Mountain Tarp, a Wastequip brand, has recently expanded its tarp line to include the ESR2000, an electric side-to-side lock and roll tarping system. Mountain Tarp is the leading manufacturer of flip tarp systems for dump bodies for paving and construction as well cable style systems, side roll and side flip systems for waste, landscaping, agriculture and scrap applications. 

Read More

Tags
Electronics Recycling
Industry News

‘Avoid the Spark' Campaign Continues Battery Safety Awareness in California

‘Avoid the Spark' Campaign Continues Battery Safety Awareness in California

Throughout October, the Avoid the Spark campaign -- a public education effort to reduce battery safety incidents -- returns to the Bay Area to engage the community. Efforts include local county battery collections, a cornerstone event benefiting the California Fire Foundation, and the launch of a dedicated battery safety resource webpage, www.avoidthespark.com. This second phase builds on the Avoid the Spark campaign launch in May, spurred by the growing epidemic of battery-related fires at recycling and waste facilities along with the hidden dangers of trashing lithium-based batteries.

Read More

Tags
Metals Recycling
ELV Recycling

Sierra Recycling and Demolition has built success at the scrapyard based on reliable equipment, advanced technology and solid culture

Shortly after World War II, Ben Sacco came to California and started Sierra Bag Company, servicing the agriculture industry. In the late fifties, Sierra Iron & Metal was born when he dedicated a portion of his operation to scrap metal collection. He then added a baler to process scrap, which he found while visiting his homeland of Italy. Sacco eventually became the official North and South American distributor for the baler manufacturer, starting Sierra International Machinery, while at the same time continuing to operate his scrapyard, Sierra Iron & Metal. About 10 years ago, the business was passed on to Ben Sacco's two sons, John and Philip Sr., both of whom have been lifelong employees and contributors to the business. The scrap recycling part of the Sacco family business today operates as Sierra Recycling and Demolition Inc., run by Phil Sacco, while Sierra International Machinery, the recycling equipment manufacturer and distributor, is run by John Sacco - both out of Bakersfield, California. 

Read More

Tags
Industry News
Plastics Recycling

Emterra's Emmie Leung awarded CPIA 2018 Leader of the Year

Emterra's Emmie Leung awarded CPIA 2018 Leader of the Year

Widely recognized as a trail blazer in the Canadian recycling industry and a passionate supporter of sustainable growth and a circular economy in the waste resource recovery business, Emmie Leung, Founder and CEO of Emterra Group can now add a new accolade to her list of accomplishments. On October 3, the Canadian Plastics Industry Association (CPIA) awarded her their prestigious 2018 Leader of the Year.

Read More

Tags
Electronics Recycling

​Inaugural International E-Waste Day aims to raise public awareness

​Inaugural International E-Waste Day aims to raise public awareness

International E-Waste Day has been developed by the WEEE Forum, an international association of e-waste collection schemes, and 26 of its members and involves around 40 different organisations in 20 different countries worldwide. The inaugural event, set for Saturday October 13th, is being used to raise the public profile of e-waste and encourage consumers to correctly dispose of their e-waste with the resulting increase in re-use and recycling rates on the day itself and into the future.

Read More

Tags
Industry News
Solid Waste

GFL Environmental and Waste Industries announce merger

GFL Environmental Inc. ("GFL") based out of Toronto, and Raleigh, North Carolina-based Waste Industries have announced that they have entered into a definitive merger agreement in a transaction that values Waste Industries at a total enterprise value of US$2.825 billion (approximately C$3.65 billion). The transaction, which is expected to close in the fourth quarter of 2018, is subject to customary regulatory approvals. 

Read More

Tags
Industry News

ISRI survey indicates brands and government can help improve recycling behaviour

ISRI survey indicates brands and government can help improve recycling behaviour

While traditionally the effort to increase recycling rates has focused on education and awareness, a new study among over 2,000 Americans conducted by The Harris Poll on behalf of The Institute of Scrap Recycling (ISRI) suggests action by brands and government may play a significant role as well. The poll revealed two-thirds (66%) of Americans agree that "if a product is not easy/convenient for me to recycle, I probably would not recycle it." The poll also provides insights into ways these two sectors can better drive recycling.

Read More

Tags
Plastics Recycling

​2018 APR Recycling Demand Champion Campaign generates almost 7 million pounds of new demand in it's first year

​2018 APR Recycling Demand Champion Campaign generates almost 7 million pounds of new demand in it's first year

A program designed to expand market demand for recycled plastics has generated almost 7 million pounds of new demand in it's first year. The APR Recycling Demand Champions Campaign, created by the Association of Plastic Recyclers (APR) in 2017 to develop new markets for recycled plastics, announced year end results at a recent APR annual meeting in St. Petersburg, FL.  APR also announced several new participants who have committed to increase their use of  postconsumer resin (PCR) in the upcoming year. 

Read More

Tags
Organics Recycling
Waste to Energy

UK waste food-recycling pioneers rolling out fleet of biomethane gas powered trucks

Food waste recycling company and sustainability pioneers, Warrens Group, a third generation, 70-year-old family business operating in the North East Region of the UK, has grown from humble beginnings to become one of the region's foremost providers of agricultural and food waste recycling services. In recent years, Warrens have forged a place for themselves at the forefront of the industry, culminating in the launch of Warrens Emerald Biogas - the region's first foodwaste anaerobic digestion facility, built in 2012. The company currently collects and recycles over 115,000 tonnes of food waste to generate over 100 million kWh of clean, green energy every year - enough to power 19,000 homes.

Read More

Tags
C&D Recycling
Wood Recycling

West Salem Machinery wood waste grinders feature easy maintenance and long-term productivity

West Salem Machinery wood waste grinders feature easy maintenance and long-term productivity

West Salem Machinery (WSM) offers rugged and reliable Horizontal and Vertical Grinders/Hogs, as well as screens and conveyors. WSM  wood waste processing machines feature a unique pivoting top case  that allows access to preventative maintenance areas, with all infeed components remaining in place. According to the Oregon-based manufacturer, their Ballistics Infeed Chute, included on their line of Vertical Grinders is a unique design that helps capture tramp metal and other uncrushables - helping to protect the grinder rotor and reduce maintenance expenses.  

Read More

Tags
Paper Recycling
Plastics Recycling

Axxess controls from EPAX designed to improve the safe use of waste compactors and balers

Epax Systems, a specialist in waste management with more than 30 years of experience, recently developed a new method to control industrial compactors and balers called Axxess controls.  According to the company, over the last decade, safety and security have become concerns for multi-use property managers who are seeking to meet Occupational Safety and Health Administration's requirements for controlling balers and compactors in their facilities. Since 2017, clients of Epax Systems, inc.  have increasingly communicated the need to improve on their traditional key switch systems, which requires employees to use an on/off key switch to control their compactor or cardboard baler.

Read More