RecycleBank sets its sights on Toronto

RecycleBank’s rewards-for-recycling program may soon be coming to Canada’s biggest city. In June, Toronto mayoral candidate George Smitherman announced his support of RecycleBank at a policy speech given at the Empire Club of Canada, calling it an innovative program and “a quadruple win” – benefiting the environment, residents, local businesses and the city.   

According to RecycleBank, their program rewards residents for recycling, saves cities money from landfill disposal costs, provides a direct economic stimulus to local businesses and helps to save natural resources.  For Toronto, Smitherman says, implementation of the program would provide a huge boost to the city’s goal of accomplishing 70 percent landfill diversion rate. RecycleBank says their programs have been a success in the United States and the United Kingdom, and it looks as though Canada is the next big step.  

As a global company headquartered in New York City, with offices in Canada and the UK, RecycleBank’s program is designed to motivate people to take greener actions, like recycling, by rewarding them with points which are redeemable at local and national retailers.   

The company has already proven a major success across more than 300 communities in the U.S. and U.K. In fact, London Mayor Boris Johnson has come out in favour of bringing RecycleBank to his city following the achievements seen in the Royal Boroughs of Windsor and Maidenhead. The two boroughs delivered a 35 percent increase in recycling rates in trial areas, and in June went borough-wide with the program. UK environment secretary Caroline Spelman told The Guardian newspaper that other local councils should follow suit.  

In the U.S., RecycleBank has helped Miami and a suburb of Hollywood increase recycling by 130 percent, saving the latter more than $119,000 in landfill costs and commodity revenue – in the first two months. In Houston, Texas, a pilot program of 20,000 households who received larger recycling containers, similar to Toronto’s blue bins, more than doubled the amount they recycle, keeping 3.3 million fewer pounds of waste out of the landfill in just four months. At the six month mark, Houston expanded the program to more than 75,000 homes and plans to continue to bring it to more neighbourhoods. 

Atul Nanda, president of RecycleBank’s Canadian Division, looks forward to RecycleBank potentially launching in his hometown.  

“My first job out of university was as assistant manager of Toronto’s recycling program, helping the city increase recycling rates and market the materials collected in the blue box program to end markets,” Nanda said.  “I believe that RecycleBank can increase Toronto’s recycling rates, and maintain that increase as well. Time and time again we’ve proven that RecycleBank is a creative and impactful environmental solution for cities.” 

RecycleBank takes the carrot – rather than the stick – approach to the recycling process. The company works to encourage recycling participation through incentives.   

Earlier this year in England, Eton and Castle Ward Councillor Liam Maxwell came out against the so called ‘bin tax’ (in which citizens are charged fees for the amount they throw out) and told the BBC that offering incentives for recycling works better.  

“It increases recycling rates, reduces our environmental impact, reduces council tax and helps local businesses,” he said. “The results of our trial with 6,000 local homes [in Windsor and Maidenhead] far exceeded our expectations.”  

If elected (Toronto’s next municipal election is this October) Smitherman says he hopes to bring RecycleBank to Toronto. The City’s blue bins are already outfitted with equipment that works with RecycleBank technology, and implementing this program would make Toronto the first city in Canada to partner with RecycleBank.   

How does RecycleBank work? It’s simple – RecycleBank is rewards for recycling. Residents recycle, RecycleBank rewards them with points based on the amount recycled, and then they can go “shopping” for products of their choice.   On pick-up days, trucks retrofitted with RecycleBank technology identify the blue bin at pick-up. The weight of recyclables is converted into RecycleBank Points, which are then deposited into a household’s personal RecycleBank.com account. The more a household recycles, the more points they receive.  

Redeeming RecycleBank Points is just like shopping online with more than 20 categories to choose from, including food and grocery, sports and recreation, entertainment, restaurants, health and beauty and more.   Points can be redeemed for rewards in the form of groceries, gift cards, unique discounts, apparel, school supplies, food, home goods and others. Members can also track their individual environmental footprint by seeing how many litres of oil and how many trees their household has saved as a result of their recycling efforts. Nanda thinks that a partnership will help Toronto in its aim to divert 70 percent of its waste.   

“RecycleBank will help Toronto increase and sustain recycling rates,” he said. “Rewards for recycling works. We’ve seen it in the U.S. We’ve seen it in the U.K. We will see it in Canada.”  

Nanda added that RecycleBank, with its technology, can help Toronto with data management on recycling participation, set out rates and incremental recycling weights as well.   

“This is data the city could never have before. This is valuable in helping the city understand how much residents are recycling, in helping to identify educational needs down to the route level, and what motivates residents to recycle.”  

Since 2005, more than 300 communities across the United States and the United Kingdom have joined RecycleBank and recycled more than 284,291 tonnes of material, helping to save close to 131 million litres of oil, and 4.2 million trees. RecycleBank’s programs have also led to a reduction of 866,811 metric tonnes in carbon emissions. The company has been recognized with a number of business and environmental awards, including being named as a Technology Pioneer by the World Economic Forum and as a Champion of the Earth by the United Nations Environmental Programme.   

RecycleBank

Company Info

Latest News

Zanker Recycling Opens 75-tph Demolition Debris Recycling System

Zanker Recycling has opened a 75 tons-per-hour (tph) Demolition Debris Materials Recovery Facility (MRF) located at the company's San Jose operation. With the addition Zanker Recycling has more than doubled its capacity to process this type of material. The system was designed, manufactured and installed by Eugene, Oregon-based Bulk Handling Systems (BHS).

The company expects to recover upwards of 90% of inbound materials. Sizing and density separation are fundamental to the system's success. After primary screening to remove large items, two BHS Debris Roll Screens prepare two size fractions for air separation. After sizing, four Nihot Single Drum Separators (SDSs) separate by density. The first SDS units remove aggregate material, such as rock and brick, while the second Nihot units extract wood from lighter material.

Read More

Tags
Waste-to-energy

Groundbreaking Ceremony Held in Surrey for North America’s First Close-Loop Waste Management System

Mayor Linda Hepner along with representatives from public funding partner, the Government of Canada and private partner Orgaworld recently broke ground on Surrey’s new organics Biofuel Processing Facility. Once completed in early 2017, Surrey will be home to the first closed-loop fully-integrated organics waste management system in North America. 

”This project is a milestone for meeting the sustainability goals we have set for Surrey,” said Mayor Linda Hepner. “Not only will the facility be the first closed-loop, fully integrated, organics waste management system on the continent, but it will reduce CO2 emissions in Surrey by 40,000 tonnes a year – that’s the equivalent of taking 8,500 cars off the road per year.”

Read More

Sponsored Content

CUT YOUR FUEL BILL FAST

Hear Shane Matsen of Sierra Mining & Crushing explain how he pays for a Cat XE Wheel Loader with the money he saves in fuel.

Read More

Tags
C&D Recycling

Rules and regulations in C&D recycling

The C&D recycling industry is always affected by large-scale regulatory actions taken by federal governments, both good and bad. In theUnited States there have been recent developments that could eventually have effect outside of the country – in Canada and elsewhere.

Below is an update on some of the actions in the U.S. that the Construction & Demolition Recycling Association (CDRA) has been working on. We present this so recyclers everywhere can be aware of some of the concepts being bandied about in the regulatory community.

Read More

Tags
Trucks & Trailers

Progressive Waste Solutions revs up use of natural gas powered collection vehicles

Progressive Waste Solutions announced in December, 2014 the official opening of its natural gas fuelling station facility in Coquitlam, British Columbia. The new operation now services the largest fleet of natural gas powered waste and recycling collection vehicles in B.C., and the largest in Canada.

“Our announcement demonstrates our commitment to being a leader in the waste services sector, providing our customers the best service in the most sustainable way possible,” said Grant Hankins, district manager for Progressive Waste Solutions. “We are proud to have the largest fleet of natural-gas powered waste and recycling collection vehicles in British Columbia and Canada.”

Read More

Join our mailing list

Latest headlines
delivered to you weekly

Recycling Product News
Tags
Solid Waste & Recycling

How Efficient Hydraulic Systems Reduce Fuel Consumption on Refuse and Recycling Trucks

In 2009, households and institutions in the United States generated 243 million tons of municipal solid waste(MSW). Every day, the average American tosses away 4.34 pounds of trash. Canadians actually tossed more than Americans – in 2008, approximately 1,031 kilograms (kg) of waste was disposed per person – or approximately 2.82 kg (6.22 pounds) per day. Although recycling rates are on the rise in both countries, and more facilities now convert solid waste into energy, the vast majority is still collected and transported to a landfill via refuse and recycling trucks.

For many years, the refuse and recycling vehicles of choice in North America have been a truck-mounted body with a collection chamber at the rear. One or two riders step off the truck at the collection location, stop and lift bags, bins or any number of receptacles and dump it into the chamber. When the collection area is sufficiently filled, the truck’s hydraulic system is engaged and hydraulic cylinders move a compression plate to pack and move the waste into the truck body. When the body is full, the truck is driven to a transfer station or landfill to unload and repeat the process.

Read More

Tags
MSW Recycling

Know what you “T.H.R.O.W”

Cascade Cart Solutions’ T.H.R.O.W. program uses collection carts equipped with RFID Xtreme tags and vehicles outfitted with a CapturIT onboard reader system.
Cascade Cart Solutions’ T.H.R.O.W. program uses collection carts equipped with RFID Xtreme tags and vehicles outfitted with a CapturIT onboard reader system.

Within their Sustainability Plan, the City of Grand Rapids, Michigan defines “green” as the triple bottom line, recognizing the interdependence of the natural environment, economic systems and social structures. The city is committed to sustainability as a means of improving the quality of life for residents through the development of a strong local economy, achievement of social equity, and promotion of the preservation of the natural environment. As part of this commitment, Grand Rapids has placed a focus on transforming its solid waste collections to reduce costs through efficient operations, provide citizens with equitable collection service and fees, and improve environmental performance through increased incinerator and landfill diversion rates.

Read More

Tags
Solid Waste & Recycling

In-Motion Weight Scale for Residential Cart Tippers

Introduced at the 2014 Canadian Waste & Recycling Expo, held in Toronto this past November, Creative Microsystems’ new LoadMan In-Motion Weight Scale for cart tippers uses state-of-the-art, patent pending load cell technology. This latest in-motion scale addresses the growing residential waste management market and leverages innovative technology that LoadMan says they have honed over 25 years in the commercial waste management industry.

“We’re delighted to introduce our LoadMan In-Motion Weight Scale for cart tippers because we see a need for a highly reliable and durable product given the abuse that cart tippers withstand on a daily basis,” said Larry Santi, president of Creative Microsystems. “We understand the challenges that haulers face and believe our new system will not only provide the accuracy that’s required to weigh individual waste carts, but will save time and money through our weigh-in-motion technology.”

Read More

Tags
MSW Recycling

Full Line of Cart Lifters

Cascade Cart Solutions offers a full line of cart lifters designed to meet all the rigorous requirements of semi-automated collection systems. Cascade has numerous rotary actuator lifter and cylinder style lifter solutions for side, front or rear loading applications, and customized lifters are available.

Cascade rotary actuator lifters are equipped with Helac brand rotary actuator units for reliable performance, and a pivoting upper saddle that allows for easy cart attachment, reducing the shock associated with “whip action” when a lift unit is shaken in the up position. Plus, a positive latch assembly requires no adjustment for maintaining the required ANSI container latch dimension. Multiple arm lengths fit specific truck applications, and arms feature grease zerk fittings on most critical pivot point bearings to ensure consistently smooth operation. Parts replacement is accomplished with hand tools, with no torch work or welding required.

Read More

Tags
Organics Recycling

Grinding It Out In the Land Clearing Business

Thomas McKellar hails from a business/marketing and land development background. Today, he is President and owner of Site Prep, a cutting-edge land clearing business specializing in pipeline right-of-ways (generally 50 miles and less) as well as general construction site clearing. He also runs Biomass Chippers.us, an in-woods chipping and grinding specialist company.

McKellar definitely considers himself to be, in part, a waste-wood/organic materials recycler. With Site Prep he has about eight years of what he calls big pipeline experience, clearing land on right-of-way construction jobs, and managing the resulting organic materials. For the majority of his time as owner of Site Prep, McKellar has used tracked mulchers for his stump grinding and land clearing work. In the fall of 2014, he purchased a CBI Magnum Force 6400T horizontal tracked grinder manufactured by Newton, New Hampshire-based Continental Biomass Industries. He is currently using it in place of multiple pieces of equipment, including his old stump grinders and his former chippers and horizontal grinders, which he has since sold. He says he has not looked back.

Read More

Tags
C&D Recycling

Mobile impact crusher key in efforts to meet new Alberta chip standards for road surfaces

A mobile impact crusher manufactured by SBM MineralProcessing out of Austria is currently being used on a trial basis to produce 2.5-inch aggregate at the world renowned Edmonton Waste Management Centre (EWMC) – adding to the city’s reputation as a leader in the recycling of C&D debris.

In November, 2014 Terrafirma Equipment Sales and Rentals, the Edmonton based heavy-equipment dealer involved in the project, provided a tour for a small group consisting of representatives from Terrafirma, SBM and the City of Edmonton. Recycling Product News was also invited along to see the crusher in action.

Read More